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"The strength of the Wolf is the Pack
and the strength of the Pack is the Wolf "
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Team
Discipline
Attitude
Effort

State Champions: 2014
Playoff Appearances:
Championship: 2014, 2013
Semifinals: 2015, 2012, 2011
Quarterfinals: 2010, 2009


RECRUITING INFORMATION

NCAA Core Courses

  • As we work with more “nontraditional courses” please note the NCAA policy on Nontraditional Courses & Credit Recovery Courses.  The MTDA Connect Credit Recovery courses DO NOT count as an NCAA core credit. 
  • MTDA original credit - If you would like to utilize MTDA original credit utilize this link to find the list of eligible course to choose from.
  • BYU correspondence – Please note the NCAA is not accepting any new coursework for NCAA eligibility from BYU.
  • Any nontraditional coursework must be noted on the transcript & will be reviewed by the NCAA high school academic review committee.  The primary phone number to ask questions regarding nontraditional coursework is ph#1-877-622-2321.

NCAA Eligibility Quick Reference Sheet

  • Significant changes for the Class of 2016 and all future classes
    • Minimum GPA requirement is now 2.30 and the corresponding Minimum SAT is now 900 or an ACT of 75
    • 7th semester and 10 core course requirement.  The NCAA now requires 10 core courses to be completed prior to a student entering their 7th semester.  This will be an additional challenge for students who are taking Algebra 1A freshman year.

Please note the NCAA still allows 1 core credit to be earned after a student graduates (in the Summer or following academic year).  For students with an IEP, 3 core credits can be earned after graduation, other than extended testing time this is the only accommodation for students who have an IEP.

The NCAA has continued to increase the academic rigor/bar for Division 1 athletes.  However, Division 2 athletes are now in the same situation. If you fall below this requirements and your eligibility is in jeopardy, see your counselor immediately to formulate a plan right away!

For any student-athlete to be eligible to play and or receive athletic scholarship money he must be cleared by the NCAA clearing house. For NCAA eligibility, a student's Grade Point Average (GPA) is factored in with his SAT or ACT scores. The higher the GPA the lower the SAT or ACT score needed for eligibility. Check out the Division 1 Core GPA and Test Score Sliding Scale. The GPA is calculated by using core courses only: math, social studies, English, science, and foreign languages (if taken). The core course requirements are as follows:
-4 years English
-3 years math
-2 years social sciences
-2 years natural/physical science (including 1 year of lab science)
-5 additional courses: at least 1 year in English, math or natural/physical science; AND 4 years of additional courses in any of the above areas, International Language, or nondoctrinal religion or Philosophy.

The above pertains to NCAA Division 1 athletes and this is where you should start but the majority of our players end up playing at the Division II, Divsion III or NAIA levels. If you feel this is where you'll end up having the opportunity, click on each level to see their respective eligibility requirements and make sure you are aware of the differences.

In order to start this process, see your counselor as soon as possible. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me any time.

STEPS:

1.
Take the PSAT test during the fall of your Sophomore year for practice.
2.
Retake the PSAT test during the fall of your Junior year for scholarship money and for additional SAT practice.
3.
Take both the SAT (www.collegeboard.com) and ACT (www.act.org) tests during the spring of your Junior year. Check the web sites for dates and sites.
4.
Register with the NCAA Clearinghouse during the spring of your junior year or the fall of your senior year. See your counselor immediately and visit www.ncaaclearinghouse.net.
5.
Focus on the ACT or SAT test you did better on. Take the ACT or SAT as many times as you can to get your best score. There are free web sites that you can use to practice for the tests. www.number2.com.
10 Important Things You Should Know About the ACT and SAT Tests
1. Neither the SAT nor the ACT is “easier” or “harder" than the other, but different types of students usually do MUCH better on one than they do on the other.
2. Take both tests as early as possible, to find the right “FIT” and to give you as much time for tutoring and additional exams.
3. Choose the test you scored the highest on and then work to improve that score.
4. After you choose the “right” test, you must plan to take it multiple times. Football recruits should have multiple scores by October of their senior year.
5. Combining scores - If you have a really high Math score on Test 1 and high Reading score on Test 2 you can combine those scores.
6. Generally speaking if you are:
Strong Math / Weak Reading = ACT
Strong Reading / Weak Math = SAT
7. Scoring Differences
- ACT has no penalty for wrong answers, so don’t leave any questions blank.
- SAT has a ¼ point deduction for all wrong answers, so a “rule of thumb” is if you can narrow answers to a 50/50 choice – pick one.  If you have no clue = skip it
8. Colleges will accept either the ACT or the SAT – They are more concerned with high scores!
9. ACT has a Science section, which really is more about using charts and graphs properly (so don’t stress) – SAT does not.
10. SAT has a stronger emphasis on vocabulary.
 
Year by Year Guideline for Players with Aspirations and Goals to Play College Football
 The academic eligibility requirements are slightly different for Division I, Division II (www.ncaaclearinghouse.net) and NAIA (www.naia.org/local/collegeboard.htm) athletes, so make sure you check their websites to know the exact requirements.
Freshman Year: Focus on academic performance and time management skills
1.
Take challenging academic courses, college prep classes, etc. Make sure to enroll in "Fitness Conditioning" class so you can then take Applied Fitness every semester the rest of your high school career.
2.
Get involved in school.
3.
Participate in multiple sports. Play football in the fall, wrestle or play basketball in the winter and definitely run track in the spring to increase your speed.
4.
Participate in as many other school activities as you can manage including school clubs, choir, band, orchestra, speech, drama, etc.
5.
Enhance your leadership skills in every way possible. Consider student council or Wolfpack Club.
6.
Participate in civic duty and community volunteer opportunities.
7.
Make sure to sign up for "Fitness Conditioning" class both semesters and attend each Pack testing week to measure your improvement and set marks for colleges to see and evaluate you.
8.
Attend spring open gym workouts.
9.
Attend the Spring/Pre-Summer Team Camp and also consider attending the Varsity Summer Team Camp.
10. Attend the summer CORE program to prepare for a great Sophomore season.
   
Sophomore Year: Focus on academic performance
1.
Take the PSAT test.
2.
Stay involved in school.
3.
Continue to participate in multiple sports.
4.
Continue to participate in other school activities and clubs.
5.
Enroll in "Applied Fitness" both semesters to ensure you are improving your speed and strength throughout your entire Sophomore year. Make sure you attend each Pack testing week to measure your improvement and set marks for colleges to see and evaluate you.
6.
Begin to gather information on your top 5 colleges of interest.
7.
Work on becoming a student of the game of football by watching games or video tape, reading books or magazines and improve your understanding of our offensive and defensive playbooks. Check with your individual position coach for more information.
8.
Attend spring open gym workouts.
9.
Attend the Spring/Pre-Summer Camp and attend the Varsity Summer Team Camp.
10. Attend the summer CORE program to prepare for a great Junior season.
   
Junior Year: Focus on academic performance
1.
Retake the PSAT test for scholarships and to further practice for the SAT.
2.
Take both the SAT and ACT tests in the spring.
3.
Meet with your counselor and stay on track academically.
4.
Continue to participate in multiple sports.
5.
Continue to participate in other school activities and clubs.
6.
Develop an athletic, academic and civic resume.
7.
Enroll in "Applied Fitness" both semesters to ensure you are improving your speed and strength throughout your entire Junior year. Make sure you attend each Pack testing week to measure your improvement and set marks for colleges to see and evaluate you.
8. Let Coach Bennett know you want to play college football and be recruited so he can include you on his list and talk with colleges who inquire about our top players. Understand that Coach Bennett sends all of your maxes, and speed and agility times to college coaches after each test so they are very important!
9.
Begin to make a highlight video on Hudl and select your top 2 games from the season. Make sure all the information in your profile is accurate and up to date.
10.
Begin to contact your top 5 colleges and let them know you are interested in playing for them.
11.
Schedule visits to your top 3 colleges of interest.
12.
Register with the NCAA Clearinghouse during the spring.
13.
Attend spring open gym workouts.
14.
Attend the Spring/Pre-Summer Camp and the Varsity Summer Team Camp.
15. Attend the summer CORE program to prepare for a great Senior season.
   
Senior Year: Focus on academic performance
1.
Register for the NCAA Clearinghouse immediately during the fall.
2.
Retake the SAT and/or ACT tests to improve your scores for scholarships.
3.
Provide leadership in the school halls, and both on and off the athletic field.
4. Continue to add to your highlight video on Hudl and select the top 2 or 3 games from your career. Make sure all the information in your profile is complete and up to date so colleges have the correct information as the recruiting process heats up. Make sure to make a premium highlight of your very best highlights from the past 2 seasons.
5. Let Coach Bennett and your position coach know your final plans on playing college football and the top schools you want to focus on so they can talk with them and help you in the recruiting process.
6.
Obtain copies of your transcripts from the counseling office secretary.
7.
Complete all college applications before the 2nd semester begins.
8.
Obtain 3 letters of recommendation from teachers, coaches, and professionals that you know. Give them your resume and provide envelopes for them to seal a letter of recommendation for you. Give them a date that you want to pick it up or have them mail it for you.